Ohio Casino Control Commission Shares Fifth Batch Of Sports Gaming Rules

The new batch contains additional rules for Type-A and Type-B licenses, including how operators can obtain a license in smaller counties.
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The Ohio Casino Control Commission (OCCC) released its fifth batch of proposed sports gaming rules on Monday for public comment. The Batch 5 rules focus on supplemental Type-A and Type-B proprietor licensing, required procedures, and general proprietor duties.

The new batch of rules stipulates that the OCCC can issue additional Type-A sports gaming proprietor licenses if the potential applicant[s]  can meet specific requirements, such as showing “a substantial, considerable, and ongoing need for additional Type-A sports gaming proprietors” based on proven market data and any additional information requested by the OCCC.

The rules concerning Type-B sports gaming proprietor licenses focus on the issuing of a license to a Type-B sports gaming proprietor in a county with a population totaling less than 100,000. The rules state that a facility in a county with a population between 50,000 to 100,000 can receive a Type-B sports gaming license if the county received at least 5 million visitors for purposes of tourism.

 

General proprietor duties

The rules included in Batch 5 also address general proprietor duties concerning sports gaming systems, sports gaming accounts, wagering rules, tickets, reserve funds, tournaments, advertising, promotions and bonuses, sports gaming event and wager type requests, sports governing body prohibited persons, sports governing body data requests, state university data requests, information technology, the security and safety of confidential information, incident reporting, accounting and revenue audits, external audits and other reports, internal audit, and patron complaints.

Under rules for patron complaints, it states that sports gaming proprietors must notify a patron of their right to file a written complaint whenever a sports gaming proprietor refuses payment of alleged winnings to a patron or if there is a dispute regarding a patron’s account, wagers, wins, or losses from sports gaming, and the proprietor and the patron are not able to resolve the dispute to the patron’s satisfaction.

Gov. Mike DeWine signed bill HB 29 into law on Dec. 22, legalizing sports betting in Ohio. The law states that sports betting should start by Jan 1. 2023, so active wagering is not expected to take place until later this year.

Rules have been released in batches according to subject matter. Batch 4 rules were released on Feb. 22. Stakeholders will have until March 18 to email written comments regarding the fifth batch to rulecomments@casinocontrol.ohio.gov.

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